Refrigeration and Air Conditioning TechnologyNew Construction Technology News]

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3 Responses to Refrigeration and Air Conditioning TechnologyNew Construction Technology News]

  • RB says:
    17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This book is great!, February 16, 2014
    By 
    RB (north carolina) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology (Hardcover)
    I have done refrigeration for over 30 years and some HVAC in the 80’s. I needed some information on current systems and this book did it. Textbooks are for theory, and if you understand how something works it is easier to repair. Another reviewer claimed it didn’t tell you how to repair something like change a motor etc. Those kind of things are in equipment manuals. By the way this book actually had the wiring diagram for a smart valve, not something you would usually find in a textbook. No textbook can replace hands on learning but you have to have a good foundation which this book provides. If you think you can read a book and become a master service technician, I would like to see how big that book would be (This book is 1650 pages). As for Nate certification you should get a dedicated Nate Study guide in what you are interested in such as Dewalt HVAC technician certification exam guide.

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  • ArcticBonfire says:
    67 of 79 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    A Good Paper Weight., August 20, 2013
    By 
    ArcticBonfire (N. Miami Beach, Florida United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology (Hardcover)

    Read the two and three-star reviews to see what is wrong with this book. This text book is the one used by most colleges that teach air conditioning and refrigeration. It was written 40 years ago. It has been up-dated haphazardly. Some new chapters have been added, along with new pictures, but it is basically still a book that was written 40 years ago.

    This book will not teach you how to repair an air conditioner. It does not give step-by-step instructions how to perform any repair job. It does not give you an orderly method to troubleshoot and diagnose air conditioning and refrigeration systems. It does not provide flow-charts. If you master this tomb, don’t expect to be able to actually service any air conditioning system, pass NATE certification, or ICE certification. It will not teach you how to change a fan motor, how to replace a compressor, or how to read a schematic.

    It will not tell you what a Mitsubishi flare is or how to make one. It incorrectly states you can’t place a saddle valve on the high-side of a charged system.

    It does not tell you what you should do if you come across an a/c system that is leaking water. It does not tell you how to unclog a blocked condensate drain. It does not tell you what you should do if you come across a system with a frozen evaporator. This book will not tell you how to balance air flow in an a/c system, nor does it teach you how to perform or calculate Manual A, B, C, E, F, G, H, I, J, etc.

    You will not find answers to most of the questions in the book. Those answers are in a guide sold or given to course instructors. The companion lab book is useless without the guide for the companion lab book that is only available to instructors.

    This book will not teach you how to braze, bend tubing, make flairs, or cut tubing. It does not teach you when and where you can use low temperature solder. It doesn’t teach when you can use a turbo torch instead of an oxy-acetylene torch.

    The book is very hard to read even if you know the material. The material presented is a mishmash, disjointed, and disorganized.

    This book will not teach you how refrigerant to add to charge a commercial a/c system, nor will it teach how much refrigerant to add to charge a commercial refrigeration system. It is vague on how to charge a residential system. It does describe what pressures and temperatures you would expect to see if you were looking at a brand new system.

    This book does not tell you how to pump a system down, or which systems you can safely pump down without destroying them. This book does not teach you how to pressure clean coils or straighten coils.

    This book does not teach you how to use a recovery unit to recover system refrigerant.

    The book does contain a great deal of utterly useless information. I don’t know a single a/c tech that actually uses psychrometrics in a/c repair.

    No one reads this book cover to cover.

    The book gives incorrect pressures for oxy-acetylene torches. Most a/c techs use the wrong pressures because of this book. It does not teach you how to how to choose a tip. Nor does it do a good job explaining how to obtain the right flame. It doesn’t explain the advantages of low-temperature soldering or the disadvantages of brazing.

    It doesn’t teach you how to remove the cores in schrader valves, how to rethread schrader valves, how to extract a broken schrader valve.

    It does not teach you how to size a contactor or a starter.

    You will not find anywhere inside it, half the components used in commercial air conditioning.

    The book tells you how to dress, how to behave, how to talk to customers, if you need that kind of information. Every other page, it tells you to be courteous.

    It doesn’t teach you how to troubleshoot or repair commercial or domestic refrigeration units or systems. What it does do is describe a few components found commercial and domestic refrigeration systems. Very few.

    A system shuts down due to a high pressure switch cut-out. What should techs check? You won’t find the answer in this book.

    The book describes the operation of a king valve, but doesn’t tell you where you where you are likely to see such a valve. It doesn’t describe the operation of the most common access valves found on most a/c systems.

    What if there is not enough room to attach your gauges to the service ports? What are low-loss fittings? What is the purpose of a JB DV-29, and how to use it? Why is it important to change vacuum pump oil before and after every use?

    Why is it wrong to use superheat at the condensing unit or subcooling at the air handler to charge a system?

    How do you size ducts?

    What happens to fan blower amp draw if ducts are too small or too large?

    How do you treat a system that has water inside it from…

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  • John A. Wilson says:
    6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    it does have useful information, but it is put together horribly, December 28, 2014
    By 
    John A. Wilson (LA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology (Hardcover)
    This book is used at many HVAC schools in the curriculum, and students need it for most book work. Yes, it does have useful information, but it is put together horribly. Some of the questions in the section/chapter reviews take quite a bit of searching to find, and that’s after reading that particular section/chapter. As most have said, it’s easier to go to ‘g00gle’ when looking for any answers to questions from the book. The author might have been a great technician, but he is no writer, and has no clue how to arrange a book. It spends a paragraph on things that are, in the real world, important, and yet 2 pages on things that are never relevant. The book will be bought though, because it’s in the curriculum and unfortunately there aren’t many other options.

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