Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System

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3 Responses to Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System

  • Mike says:
    96 of 98 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    It doesn’t get any easier than this!, January 4, 2009
    By 
    Mike

    This review is from: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System (Tools & Home Improvement)
    I was building a set of shelves that would be assembeled with picket screws when I decided I needed the K4 kit. I had a 20 year old aluminum pocket hole jig with a hardened insert that you just clamped to the work, but to get this lined up and clamped took a long time and I had about 90 holes to drill for this project. The Kreg K4 was so easy to set up and use and I was able to drill all the holes in just a fraction of the time. I like the K4 better than the K3 master because it’s easy to clamp to the work bench with the clamp recess right in front. The old cumbersome jig I had before really kept me from using pocket screw assembly very much, but I can see this K4 getting much more use. It’s a very good tool.

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  • Carlgo says:
    81 of 85 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This just works, February 6, 2010
    By 
    Carlgo (Carmel Valley, CA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System (Tools & Home Improvement)
    I got the K4 system because it seemed like it would work and I already had a similar hold-down clamp. Saved $40 for what I needed. I ended up screwing the unit to a wooden work bench, rather than using the clamp anyway and that is a good way to do it, probably the best.

    The dust collection was hooked up to my Fein vac that turns on when the drill is on. Not even a scrap of dust. Totally clean. See my Fein vac review.

    Set-up is very easy per the nice simple little instruction pamphlet and the very professional DVD that is included.

    You obviously have to use this tool correctly to get the great results. This means getting the right screws for the job. There are all sorts of different screw options from Kreg. I got the course ones for soft wood and suffered no splits or other problems. The screws seem to be of the highest quality, good for other projects as well.

    I was kind of worried that I would have to come up with some kind of a jig to hold my wood at a right angle. I found this is not necessary. What you have to do is make sure the ends are exactly 90 degrees because that end will be drawn very tight to the other board. If it is off a degree, the screws will set it one degree off, if they are perfect, then it will be perfectly perpendicular. So, just take the time to make sure your crosscuts are perfectly accurate. This joinery system is very hard to fudge, it is very unforgiving of errors.

    The bit has that hard feel to it, sharp and probably not meant to take much in the way of sharp impacts. I drilled down at a modest rate so as to not break anything and nothing did break. There is a collar that you adjust for the depth of wood. Unlike a set of collars I bought for general use, the Kreg one sets securely and doesn’t slide on you. Again, I took care not to bear down on the drill too hard because if the collar slips, you would have problems.

    You do have to hold down the two pieces of wood, right at the joint with a clamp. This always keeps the pieces flush with each other. Don’t skip this step, even if you have to buy that long clamp, expensive but useful for a lot of projects. Push the pieces close together before you set the screws. The wood pulls tightly together, but don’t get too lazy. It creates a little misalignment if you get too sloppy.

    Frankly, the screws seem so tight that glue seems unnecessary. Doesn’t hurt, but I wouldn’t bother except perhaps on a table top.

    The Kreg K4 is touted as the universal joining method and it can work that way. As somewhat of a traditionalist, I would still glue up a table top and I will still use mortise and tenons on many tables projects simply because that kind of work is expected. One of the recommend uses is to screw down a table top to its frame. I do not like that idea and recommend sliding blocks and such to let the top expand and contract independently from the frame.

    Even so, there are still thousands of interesting projects that the Kreg system does just perfectly and you will be able to use it forever, really. I see nothing about this that might be obsoleted, but if I was using it commercially where time was money I would buy a spare bit just in case. Note that after hundreds of holes my bit seems perfect and the hard metal inserts in the jig are as good as new. If I was alternating drilling and screwing with one drill, I would get that quick-change bit system Kreg offers. In my case I practiced on one piece and was so secure with the process that I went into mass production mode and didn’t switch back and forth.

    I made some utility cabinet drawer frames that were essentially knock-downs. Just marked the parts, unscrewed things and was able to carry it all in my truck. Sometimes this is a very handy way to do things. You don’t lose any strength, can carry the flat knocked-down sections up into building by yourself…all sorts of advantages.

    Kreg doesn’t give anything away! It is all quite Euro-spendy, but I cannot fault the design or materials at all. This is a tool system you will use for a very long time and it will save you a lot of time and provide superior results on many projects and repairs. A high quality product, well-designed and thought out. Happy to hand out five full stars.

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  • Dirkdaddy "Dirkdaddy" says:
    209 of 235 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Not as good as I’d hoped for, December 15, 2010
    By 
    Dirkdaddy “Dirkdaddy” (Pearland, TX United States) –

    This review is from: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System (Tools & Home Improvement)
    Unlike perhaps some users I am coming from a reasonable woodworking background, having used other jointing meathods such as biscuits and rabbits. This is fast way of making joints, but there are some drawbacks.

    I have found that when making flat face frames the wood is drawn up at the angle of the screw, and its very difficult to end up with a flat joint. If you have one, you know what I’m talking about and they even say in the DVD you will have to likely do some “minor sanding”. I did try various clamps along the joint with some improvement but no solution. Also, if you are using glue, it tends to act as a lube and lets the wood move more, but of course the joint will be stronger.

    Unfortunately, on smaller jonits like face frames, you also get movement on the other axis, as the screw acts as a pivot. I had to reclamp and check to make sure my smaller face frame parts were still alighned and most of the time they were not and adjustments were needed.

    On plywood the screw tends to take the easier way and if one layer is softer a it normally is, your screw and the joing will pull the wood out of alignment. On Kreg, there is nothing holding this alignment. To assist you really need to shell out the $30 for the right angle clamp, which I did, but even that is not perfect. The pad for the non-hole said hangs down below a typical 3/4″ board and will hold it off the work surface. And you still can get movement, there’s nothing stopping that and when you’re looking for total alignment as you are in woodworking – its dissappointing.

    You really have to also use biscuits and have a biscuit jointer to make acceptable panel joints in my opinion, and its even mentioned in the DVD. Biscuits will hold the panel in perfect alignment, then you screw it. This works well and makes clamping overnight a thing of the past.

    You also don’t get more than 10 screws of each type, good luck if you got as gift doing anything w/o a trip to the store. You would think for […] bucks you’d get more than 10 screws of common sizes so you could actually open it and use it.

    The base is 1″ tall and you will need to make 1″ spacers to hold panels at same height for better drilling accuracy, I had plenty of 3/4 but had to look for things to add to a true 1″ the way wood is finished these days. How much would have 1″ plastic add-on cost? Oh wait, this is Kreg, it would cost you $29.

    The DVD shows white numbers on the jig but the one you buy will only have embossed measurements marked on it. Plan on spending time using paint to “finish” your expensive new jig, something they could do at the factory for the price they charge.

    The case is a joke of sorts, only holds the jig and the other stuff flops around dulling the drill a bit of a mess inside.

    The holes you make are huge and a far cry from professional looking biscuit or mortise and tenon, but of course that’s the price of speed. You can get the fillers but be prepared to pay = again.

    You pay again and again with Kreg, its a neat idea but they guy is making a fortune off everything.

    It is well made and does work pretty good, with some alignment issues.

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